Preparing young people for future careers

11 August 2016

The world is changing quickly, and fortunately Australians are excellent at adapting to change, however , those who can't adapt we'll be pushed to the margins.  What follows is some crystal-ball gazing at what our students will face as they prepare to enter the workforce where  the major jobs growth, at present, is in  health-related careers.

When guiding students towards possible careers, we must avoid job snobbery, a flaw that can be found among parents, teachers  and students. Such snobbery may stop young people from following their passion and that can be a disaster. Some of the best jobs don’t require a degree. Real life experience in work, along with formal training may achieve the best outcome in some situations. Going to university can be an expensive waste of time unless students know what they want to be; a degree does not guarantee employment.

Our students will need to be entrepreneurial and create their own employment opportunities. In the future it will not be resumes and application letters that lead to employment but personal websites and videos, and there will be no jobs for life. Most people will have an average of 17 different jobs in their lifetime, with around five different careers.

Ideally, employers must become engaged at a school level. On our Community Links page there is information from the Central Ranges Local Learning and Employment Network (LLEN) where employers can pledge to help young people. This can be done through school-base apprenticeships, traineeships and structured workplace learning.

KIPPERS (kids In parents  pockets eroding retirement savings) will become commonplace. We are in the great screen age, where paper and pen have almost been replaced by screens and keyboards in their various guises. We use technology to connect with people. There may be new safety signs put up that read: “In case of fire please exit building before tweeting about it”. 

We have the most highly educated students ever, however, study alone will not prepare them for work. The world of work is dynamic, and the skills employers demand are not just those learned at school, university or TAFE. Education is about developing a set of skills.

I encourage young people to follow their dreams and aspirations, to develop their own narrative. Do what you love, work hard and enjoy it.

To see some interesting statistics click on the links and photos below.

http://mccrindle.com.au/resources/GenZGenAlpha.pdf

http://mccrindle.com.au/resources/Australia-Street-2015-Infographic_McCrindle_1page.pdf

http://mccrindle.com.au/resources/Australia-Population-Map-Generational-Profile_Infographic_McCrindle.pdf

Carol Fisher -  VETand SBAT Coordinator

carol.fisher@assumption.vic.edu.au